Take a deep breath; your boss may not judge you for crying in the office

stock-photo-crying-brunette-asian-woman--1772693 (1)-902854-editedMore than four in 10 employees (45 percent) have admitted to crying at work — and some of the executives at their company didn’t particularly mind.

Nearly the same proportion (44 percent) of CFOs said crying in the office was acceptable, as long as it wasn’t an everyday occurrence. Fewer CFOs, in fact — 26 percent — than employees said crying at work is never acceptable. Thirty-two percent of employees feel it’s never OK because colleagues will perceive the person as weak or immature. 

In addition to sorrow, anger can be an issue: More than half of employees have also lost their temper at work. Sixty-five percent said their emotional outburst was directed at a colleague; 37 percent focused their irritation at their manager. 

To discover which employee age group feels crying in the office will affect your reputation more than other generations do – along with other findings – review this information about Accountemps’ survey.

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